RELAXATION
A Bowen treatment is very relaxing.
It is mostly performed with the person lying on a treatment couch, although Tom Bowen (the originator of the work) provided beds in his clinic, order to encourage a sense of deeper relaxation.
HOLISTIC HEALING
The Bowen Technique embodies a truly holistic approach to healthcare. It is concerned not just with treating specific conditions and symptoms, but also with encouraging a natural potential for health to express itself in every aspect of the patient's life.
TIME OUT

A unique feature of the Bowen Technique is the frequent pauses between each series od moves. These are given to allow the body to respond and integrate what is being done. During these pauses, the therapist will usually leave the room.
This lets the person relax without feeling that they have to keep up a conversation ot that they are being watched.
BOWEN EFFECTS
Bowen therapists sometimes talk about the different effects on posture, particularly 'ascending' and 'descending' influences. The key to effective treatment is to find where the original organising factor in someone's condition is located. For example, a knee injury might be due to a weak toe joint or a pelvic imbalance that is putting undue strain on a knee as that person walks. Similarly, headaches may be the result of an old fall on the tailbone.

A very important function of Vitamin C in the body is its role in the production of collagen. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the body and forms into fibres which are stronger than iron wire of comparable size. These fibres provide strength and stability to all body tissues, including arteries. Vitamin C is absolutely essential in the production and repair of collagen, and is destroyed during the process, so a regular supply of vitamin C is necessary to maintain the strength of body tissues. Severe deficiency of vitamin C causes the total breakdown of body tissue witnessed in scurvy.

It is believed that whilst humans normally obtain sufficient vitamin C to prevent scurvy, we do not consume enough to maintain the strength of the walls of the arteries. Of all the structural tissues in the body, the walls of the arteries around the heart are subject to the greatest continual stress. Every time the heart beats, the arteries are flattened and stretched, similar to standing on a garden hose thousands of times a day. Many tiny cracks and lesions develop and the artery walls become inflamed. In the presence of adequate supplies of vitamin C, this damage can be readily repaired and heart disease is avoided. However, in the absence of adequate levels of vitamin C, the body attempts to repair the arteries using alternative materials: cholesterol and other fatty substances, which attach to the artery wall.