RELAXATION
A Bowen treatment is very relaxing.
It is mostly performed with the person lying on a treatment couch, although Tom Bowen (the originator of the work) provided beds in his clinic, order to encourage a sense of deeper relaxation.
HOLISTIC HEALING
The Bowen Technique embodies a truly holistic approach to healthcare. It is concerned not just with treating specific conditions and symptoms, but also with encouraging a natural potential for health to express itself in every aspect of the patient's life.
TIME OUT

A unique feature of the Bowen Technique is the frequent pauses between each series od moves. These are given to allow the body to respond and integrate what is being done. During these pauses, the therapist will usually leave the room.
This lets the person relax without feeling that they have to keep up a conversation ot that they are being watched.
BOWEN EFFECTS
Bowen therapists sometimes talk about the different effects on posture, particularly 'ascending' and 'descending' influences. The key to effective treatment is to find where the original organising factor in someone's condition is located. For example, a knee injury might be due to a weak toe joint or a pelvic imbalance that is putting undue strain on a knee as that person walks. Similarly, headaches may be the result of an old fall on the tailbone.

BACKGROUND: Parenteral administration of opioids and NSAIDs has been the mainstay for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing laparoscopic adjustablegastric banding (LAGB). Both classes of drugs, however, are associated with serious adverse effects. An addition of complimentary analgesic techniques may decrease requirement for traditional analgesics, thus reducing the incidence of side-effects. We designed the study to evaluate the effectiveness of Lavender aromatherapy in reducing opioid requirements after LAGB.

METHODS: A prospective randomized placebo controlled study was carried out on 54 patients undergoing LAGB. Upon arrival to the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), patients in the study group were treated with lavender oil, which was applied to the oxygen face mask; the control group patients received nonscented baby oil. Postoperative pain was treated with morphine. Numerical rating scores (0-10) were used to measure the level of pain at 5, 30, and 60 min. Sedation was evaluated using the Observer Assessment of Alertness/Sedation scale (0-5). Data analyzed included the amount of opioids, NRS, OAA/S, PACU discharge time, as well as the incidence of side-effects.

RESULTS: The two groups were comparable with regard to patient characteristics, intraoperative drug use, and surgical time. Significantly more patients in the Placebo group (PL) required analgesics for postoperative pain (22/27, 82%) than patients in the Lavender group (LAV) (12/26, 46%) (P = .007). Moreover, the LAV patients required significantly less morphine postoperatively than PL patients: 2.38 mg vs 4.26 mg, respectively (P = .04). There were no differences in the requirements for post-operative antiemetics, antihypertensives, or PACU discharge time.

CONCLUSIONSOur results suggest that lavender aromatherapy can be used to reduce the demand for opioids in the immediate postoperative period. Further studies are required to assess the effect of this therapy on clinically meaningful outcomes, such as the incidence of respiratory complications, delayed gastric emptying, length of hospital stay, or whether this therapy is applicable to other operations.

TREATMENT WITH LAVENDER AROMATHERAPY IN THE POST-ANESTHESIA CARE UNIT REDUCES OPIOID REQUIREMENTS OF MORBIDLY OBESE PATIENTS UNDERGOING LAPAROSCOPIC ADJUSTABLE GASTRIC BANDING
Obes Surg. 2007 Jul;17(7):920-5. Kim JT, Ren CJ, Fielding GA, Pitti A, Kasumi T, Wajda M, Lebovits A, Bekker A. Department of Anesthesiology, New York University Medical Center, New York, NY 10016, USA